How to Improve Your Balance With Neuropathy

Peripheral neuropathy can cause you to experience problems with walking and balance. This can become pretty annoying considering you may have trouble seeing if a curb is high or low and potentially falling over your own feet. To help you out, here are some tips to improve your balance.

How to Improve Your Balance With Neuropathy

  • When walking, try to keep your feet apart; think of it like you’re straddling an imaginary line.
  • When you’re turning, turn your feet first, and then your body. Lift one foot at a time while keeping your feet parallel and wide apart.
  • When you sit down, reach with both hands for the arms of the chair and lower yourself slowly into the chair.
  • When you’re getting up from a chair, lean your nose over your toes while keeping your hands on the chair to help stabilize yourself.
  • Once you’re standing, get your balance, and then start walking slowly.
  • The bathroom can be hazardous if you aren’t careful. To be safe, don’t lay out any loose rugs on the floor.
  • Have small night lights inside your house to help guide the way for you when it’s dark.
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Suprascapular Neuropathy and Its Symptoms

neuropathySuprascapular neuropathy is typically the result of traction damage to the Suprascapular nerve. This nerve arises from the upper part of the brachial plexus, the large number of nerves where they exit the spine at the base of the neck, and travels under the trapezius to the scapular where it supplies the Supraspinatus and Infraspinatus muscles.

Suprascapular Neuropathy and Its Symptoms

Damage to this nerve usually occurs during sports that involve overhead movements. Some of these sports include tennis, cricket and volleyball. Injury to the nerve can happen because of compression, traction or direct trauma. Unnatural movements of the scapula can also cause stretching of the nerve. The growth of cysts resulting from superior glenoid labral tears can compress the nerve as well.

If you think you are suffering from suprascapular neuropathy, you’ll be experiencing these symptoms:

  • Aching or burning pain of the shoulder joint.
  • Deep pain within the shoulder joint.
  • Pain that radiates through the arm.
  • Gradually occurring pain.
  • Weakness of the shoulder joint into abduction – lifting the arm out to the side – and external rotation.
  • Wasting of the Supraspinatus and Infraspinatus muscles.
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Coping with Diabetic Neuropathy

If you have diabetic neuropathy, you know how difficult and frustrating it can be just to cope.

Coping with Diabetic Neuropathy

There are no obvious signs that come with the condition, so how are people supposed to know what you’re going through, let alone understand it? It is so important to have support during your time of need, so seeking out a counselor or therapist may be just the thing you need. Or, you may want to find a support group, either in person or online, so that you can connect with others who are going through the same experiences that you are going through. By doing this, you are surrounding yourself with people who will encourage you and give you advice or points of view that you’ve never even thought of.

Not sure where to start looking? The American Diabetes Association offers online support through its website, www.diabetes.org. Even if you aren’t looking for help, there are others out there who need support, so why not lend them a helping hand?

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Diabetic Neuropathy – Effectiveness of different benfotiamine dosage…

Effectiveness of different benfotiamine dosage regimens in the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy.

Arzneimittelforschung 1999 Mar; 49(3): 220-4.

Winkler G, Pal B, Nagybeganyi E, Ory I, Porochnavec M, Kempler P.

I am very pleased with my first order from the price to the check out to the shipment. ? Sixty-three percent, 74%, and 82% of the patients on 25 mg, 50 mg and 100 mg of our medications, respectively, reported an improvement in their health.

The therapeutic effectiveness of a benfotiamine (CAS 22457-89-2)-vitamin B combination (Milgamma-N), administered in high (4 x 2 capsules/day, = 320 mg benfotiamine/day) and medium doses (3 x 1 capsules/day), was compared to a monotherapy with benfotiamine (Benfogamma) (3 x 1 tablets/day, = 150 mg benfotiamine/day) in diabetic patients suffering from painful peripheral diabetic neuropathy (DNP). In a 6-week open clinical trial, 36 patients (aged 40 to 70 yrs) having acceptable metabolic control (HbA1c < 8.0%) were randomly assigned to three groups, each of them comprising 12 participants. Neuropathy was assessed by five parameters: the pain sensation (evaluated by a modified analogue visual scale), the vibration sensation (measured with a tuning fork using the Riedel-Seyfert method) and the current perception threshold (CPT) onthe peroneal nerve at 3 frequencies: 5, 250 and 2000 Hz). Parameters were registered at the beginning of the study and at the end of the 3rd and 6th week of therapy. An overall beneficial therapeutic effect on the neuropathy status was observed in all three groups during the study, and a significant improvement in most of the parameters studied appeared already at the 3rd week of therapy (p < 0.01). The greatest change occurred in the group of patients receiving the high dose of benfotiamine (p < 0.01 and 0.05, resp., compared to the other groups). Metabolic control did not change over the study. It is concluded that benfotiamine is most effective in large doses, although even in smaller daily dosages, either in combination or in monotherapy, it is effective.

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