How to Improve Your Balance With Neuropathy

Peripheral neuropathy can cause you to experience problems with walking and balance. This can become pretty annoying considering you may have trouble seeing if a curb is high or low and potentially falling over your own feet. To help you out, here are some tips to improve your balance.

How to Improve Your Balance With Neuropathy

  • When walking, try to keep your feet apart; think of it like you’re straddling an imaginary line.
  • When you’re turning, turn your feet first, and then your body. Lift one foot at a time while keeping your feet parallel and wide apart.
  • When you sit down, reach with both hands for the arms of the chair and lower yourself slowly into the chair.
  • When you’re getting up from a chair, lean your nose over your toes while keeping your hands on the chair to help stabilize yourself.
  • Once you’re standing, get your balance, and then start walking slowly.
  • The bathroom can be hazardous if you aren’t careful. To be safe, don’t lay out any loose rugs on the floor.
  • Have small night lights inside your house to help guide the way for you when it’s dark.
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How to Reduce Foot Pain from Idiopathic Peripheral Neuropathy

You are the only one who knows how much pain from your case of neuropathy. Chances are you feel helpless and are in unbearable pain, despite how much care you show your feet. Here are a few suggestions to help you gain more control of the pain.

How to Reduce Foot Pain from Idiopathic Peripheral Neuropathy

 See a neurologist. They are best way of finding out how to understand the neurological pain you are experiencing and will let you know what treatments or prescription drugs will best treat your pain.

To endure the day to day pain or increased pain in the evening try:

  • Rub CapzasinHP onto your feet three times a day. This will probably take up to a month to start showing relief.
  • Rub in 024 Essential Oil Pain Neutralizer a couple of times a day. Warning: it smells a little strong, but it’s worth the pain relief.
  • Buy shoes with good arch support and try to stay away from shoes that cause blisters.
  • Practice simple yoga postures. These will help you take your mind off pain.
  • Practice deep breathing several times a day.
  • Meditation has also been known to help calm the pain.
  • Swimming isn’t just a good exercise for your body, but your feet as well.
  • Get a good foot examination once a year from a qualified podiatrist.
  • Cymbalta and Lyrica are relatively new drugs that help to reduce neuropathic pain; both require prescription from your doctor.
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Tips for Controlling Your Blood Sugar

If you’re reading this, then you must know of controlling your blood sugar. Sure, you may be doing alright with your blood sugar levels, but with the right mindset you can take good blood sugar control and turn it into great blood http://cialistadalafils.com/ sugar control.

Here are a few suggestions you could consider to help you improve.

Tips for Controlling Your Blood Sugar

Have a goal. Having a specific number in mind that you are aiming for will help you become motivated. If you have an A1C of 7%, that’s fantastic, but it wouldn’t hurt to try for a lower number. However, if your A1C is higher, then 7% is a great goal to shoot for. If your A1C is extremely high, though, don’t set a goal for a super low number. Instead, set a reasonable goal with your doctor, meet that goal, and then set another.

Check your blood sugar often. With all that you have going on in your life, it’s easy to overlook checking your blood sugar. But, if you aren’t checking it on a regular basis, you can’t expect to reach any goals because you are clueless to your current blood sugar level. Checking your blood sugar four times a day is certainly better than checking it once, but you are missing a lot. Six to eight checks per day is ideal, which is about every two or three hours when you’re awake. By doing this, you learn how your body reacts to certain foods and how long it takes to absorb insulin. You may even want to consider a continuous glucose monitor, which will give you an updated blood glucose trend line and can let you know when your blood sugar is too high or too low.

Carry glucose tablets everywhere. Low blood sugars don’t feel good, but with glucose tablets you can pop three or four in your mouth, wait a few minutes, and you’ll soon be on your way. It’s smart to carry around glucose tablets rather than drinking OJ or eating candy – do you really think you can drink just part of a soda or only eat a few pieces of candy? Chances are you’ll end up over correcting and sending your blood sugar into higher levels.

Get coaching. Find a diabetes educator or nutritionist to educate you and give you advice on how to improve. After speaking with this person, you will leave their office feeling more confident in yourself and motivated to improve your diabetes control.

Don’t just count carbs. Limit them. You know that you’re supposed to count your carbs and then take an insulin shot that will cover those carbs. Not only should you be counting these carbs, but you should be limiting them; this will mean you need to take less insulin which ultimately leads to more stable blood sugar levels. The best way to approach this is to talk to a nutritionist to come up with a diet plan that is right for you and your lifestyle.

For more information, or to get your questions answered, contact Molecular Labs today.

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How Tai Chi Helps with Peripheral Neuropathy

If you’ve driven past a park and seen a group of people performing carefully synchronized movements, they were most likely practicing the ancient Chinese martial art Tai Chi. This martial art is supposed to help enhance mental and physical health, so it’s no wonder that it was found to be able to help improve symptoms or peripheral neuropathy.

How Tai Chi Helps with Peripheral Neuropathy

But before you can understand how Tai Chi can help with this condition, you first need to understand what peripheral neuropathy is and how it affects those who are infected with it. Peripheral neuropathy is a systemic degenerative disease that directly affects your peripheral nervous system, which is responsible for carrying the signals from your brain and spinal column to everywhere else in your body. When this happens, you begin losing the ability to move your extremities and feel pain in your hands and feet. Unfortunately, there isn’t a cure for this condition, but the practice of Tai Chi can really help improve the symptoms that come along with it.

Patients who have stayed active through Tai Chi have reported that their episodes of severe burning and pain that they experienced on a daily basis were reduced to maybe one or two episodes a year. That’s a pretty significant amount if you ask me. The benefits of Tai Chi don’t stop there, though. It also helps with strength and balance as well as helps calm the mind and body.

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Coping with Diabetic Neuropathy

If you have diabetic neuropathy, you know how difficult and frustrating it can be just to cope.

Coping with Diabetic Neuropathy

There are no obvious signs that come with the condition, so how are people supposed to know what you’re going through, let alone understand it? It is so important to have support during your time of need, so seeking out a counselor or therapist may be just the thing you need. Or, you may want to find a support group, either in person or online, so that you can connect with others who are going through the same experiences that you are going through. By doing this, you are surrounding yourself with people who will encourage you and give you advice or points of view that you’ve never even thought of.

Not sure where to start looking? The American Diabetes Association offers online support through its website, www.diabetes.org. Even if you aren’t looking for help, there are others out there who need support, so why not lend them a helping hand?

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Benfotiamine Product Summary 7 of 7 – The End of an AGE

Benfotiamine Product Summary 7 of 7 – The End of an AGE

These are not test-tube studies. The results experienced when taking Benfotiamine occur not merely in labs, but in lives: in the bodies – and in the health – of living things, from experimental animals to human beings. In Benfotiamine, we finally have a proven way to protect tissues from the AGE assault.

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Benfotiamine Product Summary 6 of 7 – Benfotiamine in Other Vulnerable Tissues

Source: www.benfotiamine.org

Benfotiamine Product Summary 6 of 7 – Benfotiamine in Other Vulnerable Tissues

More recently, new studies have begun to document Benfotiamine’s ability to shield other tissues from AGE damage. One just-published study tested the ability of thiamin and Benfotiamine to protect diabetic rodents’ retinas from the ravages of AGE.

The researchers then gave one group of diabetic rodents Benfotiamine supplements, and left another group unsupplemented, keeping a third group of nondiabetic animals as a control group. Nine months later, they examined the animals’ eyes, testing the level of AGE in their retinas, examining metabolic abnormalities of the cells, and looking for acellular capillaries (the dead husks left behind when the cells of the tiny blood vessels of the eye die).

Benfotiamine supplements normalized AGE levels in the diabetics’ retina, as well as several key metabolic parameters within the diabetic animals’ cells – without influencing body weight or blood sugar (as measured by HbA1c). More importantly, Benfotiamine prevented the AGE-associated retinal damage. After nine months of diabetes, diabetic animals had suffered three times as many acellular capillaries as were found in healthy animals. But with the protection afforded by Benfotiamine, the number of acellular capillaries in the supplemented diabetics was indistinguishable from that of their normal, healthy cousins!

And there’s another AGE-related disease that researchers believe Benfotiamine may fight: the loss of kidney function which accompanies “normal” aging, and which is accelerated by diabetes. Dr. Paul Thornalley of the University of Essex has just completed a study designed to see if Benfotiamine will protect diabetic rodents against kidney damage. While the results have not yet been published, Dr. Thornalley has indicated that both megadose thiamin and Benfotiamine caused clear-cut reductions in the leakage of protein – with Benfotiamine showing itself to be the superior intervention. A second study is now underway to see if Benfotiamine will actually improve kidney function in diabetic animals with pre-existing kidney damage, as it has already been shown to do in the nerves of diabetic animals and humans.

Go to Part 7

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Benfotiamine Product Summary 5 of 7 – Shielding Nerve Structure

Source: http://www.benfotiamine.org/Benfotiamine.htm

Benfotiamine Product Summary 5 of 7 – Shielding Nerve Structure

While most “anti-AGE” supplements rely on test-tube “browning” experiments as the “evidence” of efficacy, Benfotiamine has been proven in multiple real-world human and animal studies to reduce AGE formation and support tissue structure and function in diabetics.

Most impressively, many randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled human trials have proven that Benfotiamine powerfully supports nerve function in diabetic neuropathy. In one trial, 24 people suffering with diabetic neuropathy took either Benfotiamine (plus doses of common B6 and B12 similar to those used in multivitamins) or a look-alike dummy pill, spread out into three pills over the course of the day, for twelve weeks. The participants started with 320 milligrams of Benfotiamine per day for the first two weeks, followed by 120 milligrams for the rest of the trial. Before and after the trial, the function of patients’s nerve cells were tested using nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and vibratory perception threshold (which tests the nerves’s sensitivity by determining the lowest level at which vibrations applied at key nerve sites are first felt).

At the end of the trial, the vibration perception threshold had “clearly” improved by 30% in those who had taken the Benfotiamine supplements, while it had worsened in the placebo group by 5% at one site and by 32% at another. At the same time, people taking Benfotiamine experienced statistically significant improvements in nerve conduction velocity from the feet, even as this aspect of nerve function deteriorated in those taking the look-alike pills!

The power of Benfotiamine to improve vibratory perception threshold and nerve conduction velocity have been confirmed in other trials. Clinical trials have also shown that Benfotiamine supports nerve function in diabetics as measured by many other methods. For instance, Benfotiamine users experience a 50% reduction in diabetic nerve pain, along with an increased ability of the nerves to detect an electrical current, respond to electrical stimulation, and regulate the heartbeat. Similarly, Benfotiamine prevents this loss of control from happening in the first place in diabetic dogs. In another human clinical trial, a B-vitamin combination using Benfotiamine as its thiamin source was put head-to-head with a B-complex supplement that included a mega dose of conventional thiamin. Benfotiamine proved its effectiveness on several of these key parameters, while the standard thiamin pill failed.

These benefits are not due to changes in blood sugar levels (either fasting, or after a meal, or averaged over several months (as measured by HbA1c), or improvements in metabolic benchmarks. They are the direct results of Benfotiamine’s AGE-fighting, metabolic-balancing powers.

Go to Part 6

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Prevention of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in dogs with Benfotiamine.

Source: www.benfotiamine.org

So far so good.

! That is why we pay attention to the quality of the medications.

Prevention of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in dogs with Benfotiamine.


Koltai MZ.
In Gries FA, Federlin K.

Benfotiamin in the Therapy of Polyneuropathy.
New York: Georg Thieme Verlag, 1998; 45-9.

Experimentally-induced diabetes of the dog leads to disturbances in the autonomous neurological function of the heart after approximately 3 months of continuously- observed diabetes. As signs of autonomic cardiac neuropathy, the heart rate variability and Valsalva ratio clearly fell in the untreated diabetic animals. Oral benfotiamine, administered from the sixth day after diabetes-induction, prevented or at least delayed these changes. According to the results, treatment with fat-soluble benfotiamine can play an important role in the therapy and prevention of cardiac autonomic neuropathy, apart from any effect on diabetic metabolic

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Diabetic Neuropathy – Effectiveness of different benfotiamine dosage…

Effectiveness of different benfotiamine dosage regimens in the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy.

Arzneimittelforschung 1999 Mar; 49(3): 220-4.

Winkler G, Pal B, Nagybeganyi E, Ory I, Porochnavec M, Kempler P.

I am very pleased with my first order from the price to the check out to the shipment. ? Sixty-three percent, 74%, and 82% of the patients on 25 mg, 50 mg and 100 mg of our medications, respectively, reported an improvement in their health.

The therapeutic effectiveness of a benfotiamine (CAS 22457-89-2)-vitamin B combination (Milgamma-N), administered in high (4 x 2 capsules/day, = 320 mg benfotiamine/day) and medium doses (3 x 1 capsules/day), was compared to a monotherapy with benfotiamine (Benfogamma) (3 x 1 tablets/day, = 150 mg benfotiamine/day) in diabetic patients suffering from painful peripheral diabetic neuropathy (DNP). In a 6-week open clinical trial, 36 patients (aged 40 to 70 yrs) having acceptable metabolic control (HbA1c < 8.0%) were randomly assigned to three groups, each of them comprising 12 participants. Neuropathy was assessed by five parameters: the pain sensation (evaluated by a modified analogue visual scale), the vibration sensation (measured with a tuning fork using the Riedel-Seyfert method) and the current perception threshold (CPT) onthe peroneal nerve at 3 frequencies: 5, 250 and 2000 Hz). Parameters were registered at the beginning of the study and at the end of the 3rd and 6th week of therapy. An overall beneficial therapeutic effect on the neuropathy status was observed in all three groups during the study, and a significant improvement in most of the parameters studied appeared already at the 3rd week of therapy (p < 0.01). The greatest change occurred in the group of patients receiving the high dose of benfotiamine (p < 0.01 and 0.05, resp., compared to the other groups). Metabolic control did not change over the study. It is concluded that benfotiamine is most effective in large doses, although even in smaller daily dosages, either in combination or in monotherapy, it is effective.

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