6 Tips to Avoid Foot Problems Related to Neuropathy

Those who suffer the loss of feeling in their feet have a condition that is referred to as peripheral neuropathy.  Patients with diabetes are very susceptible to this condition, but there are many other causes for this. Some of these causes include post chemotherapy, vitamin deficiency, adverse reactions to medication, infection, excessive alcohol intake and autoimmune diseases. Typically a person knows that something is wrong with his or her body because they feel pain, however, those who suffer from neuropathy are unable to feel the pain, leading to foot related injuries going unattended. By this happening, any of these injuries can become exceedingly worse over time, many times even resulting in an infection, ulcers or an amputation. Here are some tips to keep you from being stuck in this sort of situation.

6 Tips to Avoid Foot Problems Related to Neuropathy

  1. Be sure to inspect your feet daily. You should be aware of any blisters or irritations.
  2. Wash your feet every day with warm water and mild soap.
  3. Moisturize your feet every day with lotion to ensure that your feet are soft.
  4. When cutting your toenails, make sure you cut them straight across. Make sure to see your podiatrist if you develop an issue such as an ingrown toenail.
  5. Do not acid medications to remove corns or calluses – you will probably just end up causing more damage this way.
  6. Don’t ever go barefoot! Also make sure that the shoes you’re wearing fit you correctly. Shoes that are too tight or rub your foot the wrong way can cause you some problems.
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How to Improve Your Balance With Neuropathy

Peripheral neuropathy can cause you to experience problems with walking and balance. This can become pretty annoying considering you may have trouble seeing if a curb is high or low and potentially falling over your own feet. To help you out, here are some tips to improve your balance.

How to Improve Your Balance With Neuropathy

  • When walking, try to keep your feet apart; think of it like you’re straddling an imaginary line.
  • When you’re turning, turn your feet first, and then your body. Lift one foot at a time while keeping your feet parallel and wide apart.
  • When you sit down, reach with both hands for the arms of the chair and lower yourself slowly into the chair.
  • When you’re getting up from a chair, lean your nose over your toes while keeping your hands on the chair to help stabilize yourself.
  • Once you’re standing, get your balance, and then start walking slowly.
  • The bathroom can be hazardous if you aren’t careful. To be safe, don’t lay out any loose rugs on the floor.
  • Have small night lights inside your house to help guide the way for you when it’s dark.
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Common Side Effects of Neuropathy

There are two main types of neuropathy: autonomic and peripheral. Autonomic neuropathy damages nerves that control involuntary functions, such as heart rate, blood pressure perspiration and digestion. Peripheral neuropathy damages motor and sensory nerves that lead to pain, numbness and weakness. If you suffer from neuropathy, you should know the side effects and when to seek treatment.

Common Side Effects of Neuropathy

Dizziness and Fainting

Dizziness and fainting are side effects associated with neuropathy. Because these nerves are damaged, blood vessels can’t contract and expand to control blood pressure. You’re most likely to experience dizziness and fainting when standing after sitting or lying down. This happens because blood vessels in your lower body don’t effectively constrict or shrink when blood pressure increases. This causes blood to pool in your legs, which reduces blood pressure in the brain.

Loss of Sensation

Peripheral neuropathy can cause a loss of sensation. This occurs because damage to sensory nerves causes numbness and an inability to determine joint position, which can cause incoordination. You may notice sensory loss that starts in your hands or toes that eventually affects your arms or legs. This can be serious because you may not be able to feel a sore or ulcer developing in the feet. The open sore or ulcer can get infected, which may lead to serious complications.

Movement Difficulties

Neuropathy may affect nerves that control muscles, such as motor nerves in the hands, arms, feet or legs, making it difficult to remove. You may also experience cramps, difficulty breathing, difficulty swallowing, joint instability, lack of coordination and loss of muscle tissue.

 

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The Long Term Effects of Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral neuropathy affects the nerves outside of the brain or spinal cord and can cause changes to sensation, movement and involuntary functions. The nerve damage from this condition can have lasting effects that can impact your everyday life. Here are just a few of those effects.

The Long Term Effects of Peripheral Neuropathy

Reduced Feeling: Peripheral neuropathy affects three types of nerves: sensory, motor and autonomic. The sensory nerves send information to the brain, but when these nerves are damaged by peripheral neuropathy, you can experience nerve pain, burning sensations or tingling. You may even experience numbness that starts in the feet and moves up in the body. With this numbness, you may have reduced feeling in your limbs, which can affect your ability to sense changes. If the injury goes untreated, you could end up with an infection.

Problems Moving: Since peripheral neuropathy can affect the motor nerves, you could end up with a partial or total loss of movement and muscle control. It can also cause muscle atrophy, in which you could lose some muscle tissue. You may also have a lack of muscle control and dexterity, which can affect your ability to do tasks such as writing with a pen.

Weight Loss: If you have peripheral neuropathy you could lose weight due to the autonomic nerve damage symptoms. You could even lose more than 5 percent of your body weight. You may have nausea and vomiting after meals as well. The autonomic symptoms of peripheral neuropathy cause you to feel full after eating a small amount of food, which can also affect weight. Motor nerve damage in your throat can affect your ability to swallow, which may cause you to eat less.

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What Exactly is Neuropathy?

In the United States, about 20 million people are suffering from something called neuropathy. So, what is it exactly? It’s a collection of disorders that happen when the nerves outside of your brain and spinal cord are damaged; this is typically called peripheral neuropathy. It can affect nerves that control how you move and even those that control the sensations you feel, like coldness or pain. It also interferes with internal organs, such as your heart, bladder, or intestines.

What Exactly is Neuropathy?

If you think you may be suffering from neuropatthy, you’re most likely feeling a tingling pain or burning sensation, which can be treated with the help of some remedies or medical food, such as Neurvasia.

These pains don’t exactly have a specific time that they last, though. To get to the underlying cause of this, you have to take a few things into consideration, such as your diet, any diseases you have, or trauma. However, many cases have shown to have no known reason to cause it.

Peripheral neuropathy can be broadly classified into the 3 different categories:

  1. Mononeuropathy which involves just a single nerve.
  2. Multiple mononeuropathy  in which two or more nerves are affected.
  3. Polyneuropathy which generally affects just the peripheral nerves.

Neurophathies can also be classified by the functions it interferes with, such as motor, sensory, autonomic, or mixed, or the length of time it lasts. Acute meaning hours or days, subacute meaning weeks or months, and chronic meaning months or years. Probably the most common form of n europathy is peripheral polyneuropathy, which impacts the feet and legs on both sides of the body.

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Suprascapular Neuropathy and Its Symptoms

neuropathySuprascapular neuropathy is typically the result of traction damage to the Suprascapular nerve. This nerve arises from the upper part of the brachial plexus, the large number of nerves where they exit the spine at the base of the neck, and travels under the trapezius to the scapular where it supplies the Supraspinatus and Infraspinatus muscles.

Suprascapular Neuropathy and Its Symptoms

Damage to this nerve usually occurs during sports that involve overhead movements. Some of these sports include tennis, cricket and volleyball. Injury to the nerve can happen because of compression, traction or direct trauma. Unnatural movements of the scapula can also cause stretching of the nerve. The growth of cysts resulting from superior glenoid labral tears can compress the nerve as well.

If you think you are suffering from suprascapular neuropathy, you’ll be experiencing these symptoms:

  • Aching or burning pain of the shoulder joint.
  • Deep pain within the shoulder joint.
  • Pain that radiates through the arm.
  • Gradually occurring pain.
  • Weakness of the shoulder joint into abduction – lifting the arm out to the side – and external rotation.
  • Wasting of the Supraspinatus and Infraspinatus muscles.
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The Best Foods for Better Blood Sugar Control

Controlling your blood sugar levels doesn’t have to be a hassle. With the right diet and moderate exercise you can really get on track with your blood sugar.  Here is a list cialis buy canada of a few foods that are known to help regulate insulin levels.

The Best Foods for Better Blood Sugar Control

Fiber Foods: There are 2 types of fiber: soluble and insoluble. Insoluble fiber doesn’t digest and moves food quickly through the digestive tract. Soluble fiber absorbs water and develops a gel-like consistency during digestion. This slows the rate of digestion and how fast sugars are absorbed into the bloodstream.

By keeping a lower rate of sugar absorption, you are in better control of your body’s blood sugar levels. Some soluble fiber foods include: oatmeal, applesauce or apple pulp, rice bran, oat bran, peas, barley, beans, psyllium husks, flax seed, strawberries and citrus fruit.

Garlic: Garlic actually helps to prevent the progression of diabetes because it can help protect the body from inflammation and stops sugar from binding to proteins. It has also been found to be more effective, in some cases, than some medication that aids in the control of blood sugar levels. Other members of the garlic family, such as onions, shallots and leeks, also help control blood sugar.

Cinnamon: Cinnamon and cinnamon extract has been shown to reduce blood sugar levels in patients who have had difficulty doing so.

Green Tea: Green Tea contains a compound called epigallocatechin-3-gallate, which has been known to prevent the conversion of non-carbohydrate compounds into sugar in the liver. In short, green tea helps maintain metabolic health. This, in turn, can tremendously help with diabetes control and heart disease. 

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Yoga and Neuropathy: Yoga Poses That Can Help with Your Neuropathy Symptoms

According to the Neuropathy Association, there are more than 100 different types of peripheral neuropathy, which can be caused by diabetes, but may be caused by other factors as well, such as autoimmune disorders, tumors or trauma to specific parts of your body. The most common symptoms include numbness, tingling, difficulty balancing or other abnormal sensations. However, certain yoga poses can actually help alleviate certain symptoms.

Yoga and Neuropathy: Yoga Poses That Can Help with Your Neuropathy Symptoms

Inversions: Inversions are yoga poses in which you invert your body, such as forward bends, headstands, shoulder stands, and downward-facing dog.

These poses help calm your mind, strengthen your core muscles and stimulate the endocrine system. Inversions may also help to ease joint pain and stiff ligaments, help to soothe the central nervous system and reverse the numbness that come with with neuropathy.

Feet Exercises: Many people who suffer from neuropathy have problems with numbness and tingling in their feet. Finger and toe exercises can help with the neuropathy in your feet. Thread your fingers between your toes while you’re sitting on the floor in a cross-legged position. Then, spread and stretch your fingers to increase the circulation and range of motion of your toes. Repeat this for several minutes.

Pawanmuktasana: Pawanmuktasana is a simple pose that can help to restore strength in different areas of your body that have been affected by neuropathy. Pawanmuktasana, also known as knees-to-chest, is a pose performed while lying down. Bring your right knee to your chest and hold your shin with your arms, trying to bring your head to your knee. Hold this pose for a few moments, and switch legs. Repeat this up to four times.

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How to Reduce Foot Pain from Idiopathic Peripheral Neuropathy

You are the only one who knows how much pain from your case of neuropathy. Chances are you feel helpless and are in unbearable pain, despite how much care you show your feet. Here are a few suggestions to help you gain more control of the pain.

How to Reduce Foot Pain from Idiopathic Peripheral Neuropathy

 See a neurologist. They are best way of finding out how to understand the neurological pain you are experiencing and will let you know what treatments or prescription drugs will best treat your pain.

To endure the day to day pain or increased pain in the evening try:

  • Rub CapzasinHP onto your feet three times a day. This will probably take up to a month to start showing relief.
  • Rub in 024 Essential Oil Pain Neutralizer a couple of times a day. Warning: it smells a little strong, but it’s worth the pain relief.
  • Buy shoes with good arch support and try to stay away from shoes that cause blisters.
  • Practice simple yoga postures. These will help you take your mind off pain.
  • Practice deep breathing several times a day.
  • Meditation has also been known to help calm the pain.
  • Swimming isn’t just a good exercise for your body, but your feet as well.
  • Get a good foot examination once a year from a qualified podiatrist.
  • Cymbalta and Lyrica are relatively new drugs that help to reduce neuropathic pain; both require prescription from your doctor.
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Tips for Controlling Your Blood Sugar

If you’re reading this, then you must know of controlling your blood sugar. Sure, you may be doing alright with your blood sugar levels, but with the right mindset you can take good blood sugar control and turn it into great blood http://cialistadalafils.com/ sugar control.

Here are a few suggestions you could consider to help you improve.

Tips for Controlling Your Blood Sugar

Have a goal. Having a specific number in mind that you are aiming for will help you become motivated. If you have an A1C of 7%, that’s fantastic, but it wouldn’t hurt to try for a lower number. However, if your A1C is higher, then 7% is a great goal to shoot for. If your A1C is extremely high, though, don’t set a goal for a super low number. Instead, set a reasonable goal with your doctor, meet that goal, and then set another.

Check your blood sugar often. With all that you have going on in your life, it’s easy to overlook checking your blood sugar. But, if you aren’t checking it on a regular basis, you can’t expect to reach any goals because you are clueless to your current blood sugar level. Checking your blood sugar four times a day is certainly better than checking it once, but you are missing a lot. Six to eight checks per day is ideal, which is about every two or three hours when you’re awake. By doing this, you learn how your body reacts to certain foods and how long it takes to absorb insulin. You may even want to consider a continuous glucose monitor, which will give you an updated blood glucose trend line and can let you know when your blood sugar is too high or too low.

Carry glucose tablets everywhere. Low blood sugars don’t feel good, but with glucose tablets you can pop three or four in your mouth, wait a few minutes, and you’ll soon be on your way. It’s smart to carry around glucose tablets rather than drinking OJ or eating candy – do you really think you can drink just part of a soda or only eat a few pieces of candy? Chances are you’ll end up over correcting and sending your blood sugar into higher levels.

Get coaching. Find a diabetes educator or nutritionist to educate you and give you advice on how to improve. After speaking with this person, you will leave their office feeling more confident in yourself and motivated to improve your diabetes control.

Don’t just count carbs. Limit them. You know that you’re supposed to count your carbs and then take an insulin shot that will cover those carbs. Not only should you be counting these carbs, but you should be limiting them; this will mean you need to take less insulin which ultimately leads to more stable blood sugar levels. The best way to approach this is to talk to a nutritionist to come up with a diet plan that is right for you and your lifestyle.

For more information, or to get your questions answered, contact Molecular Labs today.

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